Pioneers in Flat Advocacy: Samantha Paige (Last Cut Project)


Pioneers in Flat Advocacy

A blog series designed to highlight and amplify the voices of the flat advocates who blazed the trail and laid the foundation for those that followed.


Samantha Paige (Last Cut Project)

Samantha (Sam) Paige is an artist, mother, young thyroid cancer survivor, and BRCA-1 previvor who lives in Los Angeles with her daughter. She initially reconstructed with breast implants after her prophylactic double mastectomy, but never felt comfortable with them. After eight years feeling “detached” from her body, she decided to explant and go flat. It was during this period of intense change and renewal in her life that she created Last Cut Project, a multimedia documentary project about asking the big questions in life and taking a look at our significant decisions (“last cut moments”). Sam is also an inspirational speaker, and recently published her first book, Last Cut (10% of proceeds benefit teen literacy nonprofit Get Lit). Sam has been featured in Equinox’s “Commit to Something” campaign, People, Allure, SHAPE, USA Today, and more.


When you were making your reconstructive choice, how did you end up choosing flat?

“I initially chose reconstruction with silicone implants with my preventive double mastectomy in 2008. When I was facing surgery, I was presented by my surgeon with the primary choices of silicone implants versus saline implants. The option of going flat was not presented as a viable one, and certainly was not discussed without bias. The conversation was very much around how most women, as well as their partners, were happiest with reconstruction and spoke to going flat with a negative overtone. I recall asking for the possibility of a DEIP flap reconstruction to avoid the implants, but was told I did not have sufficient body fat. There were whispers within me to make a different choice. However, I had not seen or been part of discussions around flat being a strong and viable option. 

“In 2016, after having lived unhappily with the silicone implants for 8 years, I opted for an explant surgery. I had felt unwell and was not happy with how I looked (even though my reconstruction had gone beautifully) for years. Finally, after contracting a MRSA staph infection, I took action. After booking my explant surgery, I discovered Vonn Jensen’s Flattopper Pride account, which finally offered visual representation to what I had been desiring and wanting for myself. “

How has your surgical result affected your healing process moving forward?

“After my explant surgery, I finally feel well and at home in my body. Removing the implants has allowed me the space, literally and figuratively, to heal from prior surgeries and medical experiences. I feel embodied and whole. I am strong and well. I finally feel like myself.”

How did you decide that you wanted to be an advocate?

“There was something within me that knew I wanted to share my explant process from the moment I made the decision to have that surgery. The day I booked the surgery was the day that I started Last Cut Project and asked Lisa Field to photograph me. I was saddened by the way my choices had been presented to me years prior. I hoped that by sharing my own story with raw openness, I would afford someone else the opportunity to make a more holistic and balanced choice for themselves. There is no right choice for any unique body. However, there is right presentation of full and unbiased information around these choices we make. There is also a need to remove any stigmas around the differences that all bodies exhibit and experience.”

What is your proudest accomplishment as an advocate?

“I was honored to model in and bare my flat chest with mastectomy scars for Equinox’s 2017 Commit to Something campaign. When I was able to stand with my daughter on Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles underneath a 10-story billboard of that campaign, I felt great pride in my ability to exist in a body that feels like my own. Modeling that to my daughter every day is a goal and a privilege. More broadly, all of my work and willingness to share my own story of going flat through Last Cut Project is in an effort to let others know it is brave and courageous work to stay connected to one’s own truth through any and all of life’s challenges.”

What has been your biggest challenge as an advocate?

“I would say the biggest challenge as an advocate is to remind others consistently that my story is mine, and theirs is theirs. We all have to pave our own way. We can learn from and with each other, but these are very personal matters. There is no right way other than to remain radically honest with oneself.”

What have you learned as an advocate that you would like other advocates to know?

“There is incredible value in humbly and honestly sharing your story. Doing so is shifting the tides of what is shown in the media and what is considered when others face these same choices.”

What is your vision for flat advocacy generally? What do you want the future to look like for women going flat?

“I hope that every human who faces these choices with their bodies will be met with honest, unfiltered and unbiased information so that they can make informed decisions that are connected to their truest self. I envision that we will continue to see bodies of all shapes, colors, abilities and experiences in the media.”


All images below are credited to photographer Lisa Field for Last Cut Project

Visit the Last Cut Project website to get your copy of Sam’s book today & use code NOSHIRT40 to claim your 40% discount!


A pioneer may start as a lone voice in the wilderness, but their passion for and commitment to their cause inspires others to join them. This has led to exponential growth in the field of flat advocacy over the last decade or so. In 2020, we have flat photography projects, full length memoirs, nonprofit organizations, communities on social media, and even gatherings across the world… all made possible by the work of the advocates who blazed the trail.

If you know of a pioneer in flat advocacy that you’d like to see featured, please let us know!


Disclaimer: Any and all information published by Not Putting on a Shirt (NPOAS) on behalf of a third party is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as a substitute for medical or legal advice from a licensed professional. Views expressed and claims made by third parties do not necessarily represent the views of NPOAS.


Announcing our Council of International Advocates

The Council of International Advocates consists of leaders in the flat advocacy community worldwide who have come together cooperatively to advance the interests of women going flat after mastectomy. The Council presents a unified message to stakeholders across the globe that aesthetic flat closure deserves parity.

Announcing our Council of International Advocates!


Flat advocacy is a global movement, with a common purpose. The Council of International Advocates at NPOAS consists of leaders in the flat advocacy community worldwide who have come together cooperatively to #putflatonthemenu for our mothers, sisters, friends, and daughters. We are stronger together!

Meet our Council Members at the Council Page.

#aestheticflatclosure
#putflatonthemenu
#notputtingonashirt

Mastectomy Tattoos with Artist Amy Black

All about mastectomy tattoos with Amy Black, renowned tattoo artist & founder of PinkInkFund.org

Introduction to Mastectomy Tattoos

Healing Through Art. Tattoos can be an important component of healing for many women following their mastectomy surgery – both those who chose to reconstruct their breasts AND those who chose to go flat. Tattooing can be a way for women to take back ownership over their bodies, having had so little control during breast cancer treatment.

Restorative vs. Decorative. For some, tattoos can restore the appearance of their lost nipple/areola (restorative, or reconstructive tattoos). Others choose mastectomy tattoos that are decorative (also called artistic, or “scar covering”) rather than anatomic, and that hold special meaning for them – flowers, vines, words, and designs of every shape and color.

Insurance & Other Considerations. Unfortunately, many insurance companies do not provide coverage for mastectomy tattoos. Those that do, only cover restorative (not decorative) tattooing as part of the “breast reconstruction” process. Patients considering mastectomy tattoos should also be aware that not all tattoo artists will produce optimal artwork, because tattooing is a largely unregulated field, and particularly for restorative tattoos should seek out a licensed artist specializing in this area who can display a portfolio of previous work. (More about logistics and risks.)

Mastectomy Tattoo: a tattoo that is drawn on top of the mastectomy site, usually to cover mastectomy scars – includes both restorative tattoos (restoring the nipple/areola) and decorative pieces (non-anatomic) of various sizes.

Restorative Tattoo: A highly specialized practice of paramedical tattooing, which restores the appearance of the nipple and/or areola (reference). Surgical reconstruction of the nipple can produce a nipple-like contour (shape) but permanent coloration and detail restoration requires modification with ink.


Gallery of Amy’s Work

View more flat closure mastectomy tattoos at our Gallery Page.


Q&A Interview

How did you, as an artist, become interested in mastectomy tattoos?

I became aware of them because of a fellow tattoo artist doing them long before I did back sometime before 2010. I did not pursue an interest in doing them though, I was approached by a cancer survivor asking if I was capable of creating a 3D nipple for her to match her other natural breast in 2010 so the opportunity came to me. I did not know at the time it would flourish into what it has become today and I’m very grateful and honored to be of service to people in need with art.

How do patients find a tattoo artist? Is there a coalition or national organization? Steps to take?

It has all been fairly organic with the sporadic major media. There are small organizations here and there throughout the world. Many of the breast cancer support groups now know of tattoo artists that they tend to refer to others, and some people do their own research as mastectomy tattooing has become far more visible online since 2010. I get referrals from both healthcare, organic online discovery, and cancer support groups as well as word of mouth from other survivor clients.

What are some considerations patients should be aware of when considering a tattoo? Medical, emotional, financial, etc.

They should definitely make sure the tattoo artist/shop has all the proper licensing needed per health department/etc. The artist should have good examples of their work available that includes examples that are similar to what the client is looking for. Make sure to communicate with the artist as much as needed to make sure you feel comfortable with them both professionally and artistically, that they understand your vision in order to create it for you on skin. Emotionally: it’s unknown how someone will feel throughout the process, having some nerves before the process can be totally normal and understandable, just try to approach it as calmly and grounded as possible in order to make the best decisions and be able to have the best experience you can. Financially it will change from person to person as every artist charges differently for their craft.

Are there health risks to tattooing over the mastectomy site?

There are always inherent risks with getting tattooed in general. If you find an artist who has experience working with scar tissue, specifically post mastectomy scars and other types of affected tissue (i.e. radiated skin, etc) would be best. Health risks can vary since artists use different products for pigments, cleaners, needles and more, so unfortunately there are probably too many variations to be able to answer this in one simple answer. There is always the chance someone could be allergic to the ink(s) used or other products used during the tattoo process, and sometimes that will not be known until after the tattoo process has begun or after it is completed. There will always be a risk of infection if the artist is not following proper protocol with proper hygiene, and the same risk also applies to the client if they do not follow proper healing instructions and hygiene. 

Are there certain inks that are a better choice for oncology patients? We understand that tattoo inks are not regulated by the FDA.

Since not all tattooers use the same brands of inks, it’s unknown if there are some who use lesser quality inks or not. I can only speak for myself, where I only used inks that have time tested quality standards, and operate with high standards in their businesses so I feel confident that any colors I choose to apply should be the best choice(s) for each specific client.

Have you ever had a client who regretted getting their tattoo?

If I do, I have not heard from them. I have a vague memory of one person many years ago later wishing they did not get the tattoo purely because they realized they just did not want to be tattooed later in life, not because they were unhappy with the work that was done. I pre screen clients pretty heavily to make sure they are not making a mistake, and have even turned away or even lost clients because i would rather tell someone to not get tattooed than to get tattooed: tattoos are not for everyone and should not be taken lightly.

What’s the typical timeline between surgery and tattooing?

A minimum of 3 months is typically needed for anyone, some clients need more than that, waiting for discoloration in the scar lines to dissipate is important for the best tattooing possible, as well as treating any scar tissue that can sometimes transform and create a surface that is not best for tattooing, but that is again a case by case basis.

Do reconstructive tattoo artists typically work with medical professionals?

Not sure, I only know a handful and most do but not all of them do.

How does insurance coverage and financing work?

Insurance will only reimburse for nipple tattoos, not decorative mastectomy tattoos, and it will vary per carrier and level of coverage the person has on whether they will reimburse full, partial or nothing. It will also be affected by if the person is tattooed by someone who is a recognized “in network” or “out of network provider” whether a carrier will consider reimbursement or can process the claim for the client. Financing will differ from artist to artist on a per case basis sometimes. Right now there are only 2 mastectomy tattoo non profits I am aware of in the United States: Pink Ink Fund (which I founded) and the P.Ink Project which offer varying levels of financial assistance.

Speaking of financing, can you tell us about your nonprofit, the Pink Ink Fund? What inspired you to found this organization, and why is this work so important?

The Pink Ink Fund was inspired by doing my first few mastectomy tattoos, being a self employed artist who did not have insurance for many years, and suspecting there were probably many others like myself without insurance and all the means to pay for treatment let alone getting some critical artwork done to help heal after dealing with cancer. I didn’t want someone to be blocked from receiving art that could help change their lives for the better.

Taken from the mission page of the charity’s website:

Pink Ink Fund will raise money and solicit donations in order to offer financial assistance, education, and outreach to those in the community needing post mastectomy reconstructive, restorative, and recovery tattooing. Pink Ink Fund, in partnerships with the medical community and service care providers, will work to educate cancer patients, survivors and those genetically predisposed to breast cancer on their full spectrum of options on breast, nipple, and areola reconstructive tattooing following mastectomy surgery...”

Pink Ink Fund Website
Do you think that mastectomy patients generally know about tattooing as an option?

Ten years ago there was very little knowledge about tattoo options coupled with only a few tattoo artists around the world doing this kind of work. Fast forward to 2020 and it has increased a lot, but there are still clients contacting me that do not have all the information they should have on it. I’m hoping one day when I can step back from tattooing a bit I can help spread education further to make sure every patient knows their full amount of options.

Do you have any comments or feelings about the aesthetic quality of the mastectomy closures you have seen in your career? Do you think the quality of the closure affects their tattooing experience, and if so, how?

Not being a surgeon, I can not begin to imagine the complexities and difficulties of their jobs not only recreating body parts but also closing up areas of tissue to ensure the best healing and results they feel are possible. I know that some patients are great candidates for certain products and techniques, and others are not, and sometimes they may have the best closures but something happens to make perfect healing not possible. In the end, the smoother and less visible scarring is always best for everyone, but that can be difficult if the patient chooses large implants under tight skin, or there are allergic reactions that happen, infections and more. Since I’ve had to work with every incision line I can think of at this point, and a variety of scar tissue, I have found that there are often solutions that work for my clients with using art to help cover, redirect or even sometimes highlight the areas they want.



Mastectomy Tattoo Resources

Nonprofit – Financial Assistance for Patients
Nonprofit – Financial Assistance for Patients
Restorative Tattoo Information, Training and Certification, by Stacie-Rae Weir
Articles, Pages & Galleries

What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Getting a Nipple Tattoo (Healthline)

Garnett Tattoo’s Mastectomy Tattoo Page

Breast Cancer NOW article

Terri Coutee (DiepC Journey)’s Interview with Artist Eric Eye

Inspiring Mastectomy Tattoos (Inked Magazine)

Mastectomy Tattoos article (Live Better With)

21 Must See Mastectomy Tattoos (Headcovers Unlimited)

Woman’s Day article on mastectomy tattoos (Alexis Hobbs)


Spread the Word! Aesthetic Flat Closure (VIDEO)

Please share so that those facing mastectomy who don’t want breast mound reconstruction know what to ask for! Aesthetic flat closure.

(Note: video is optimized for mobile.)

“Going FLAT? Let’s Be Clear.

Ask your surgeon for an “aesthetic flat closure” as defined by the National Cancer Institute so they understand exactly what you want: a smooth, neat, flat chest with no extra skin at all. You want a comfortable result you can live with. You want an aesthetic flat closure.”

Many thanks to our amazing Advisors at Midwest Breast & Aesthetic Surgery for their help with this video, and for always being a voice for women.

#aestheticflatclosure
#putflatonthemenu
#notputtingonashirt

Why I Advocate for Aesthetic Flat Closure

ReThink Breast Cancer has just published our guest post about aesthetic flat closure!

Canadian advocacy organization ReThink Breast Cancer focuses on the needs of young women facing breast cancer in their legislative and other advocacy initiatives. They also publish thought-provoking blog posts from survivors, thrivers, advocates, and providers on all things breast cancer-related. They just published our guest post on advocating for aesthetic flat closure!

The importance of “aesthetic flat closure” cannot be overstated. Before, women struggled to communicate their wishes to their surgeons – and that ambiguity was weaponized by my surgeon, and others (1 in 20 women going flat, in fact). But now, women have clear language with the weight of the NCI behind it. This ensures providers understand exactly what patients want. And because clarity is a vehicle for accountability, it has the potential to end intentional flat denial altogether.

Kim Bowles, for ReThink

Read the whole guest post here.

#aestheticflatclosure
#putflatonthemenu
#notputtingonashirt

Advocating for Women Who Choose to Go Flat After Mastectomy

The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) just published our guest post about aesthetic flat closure!

Many thanks to the good people at NCCS for helping spread the word about aesthetic flat closure! Every woman facing mastectomy deserves full and fair disclosure of all of her reconstructive options, and for her choice to be respected.

Who amongst you will argue that women who decide to go flat instead of pursuing conventional breast reconstruction don’t deserve a decent aesthetic result they can live with? Who amongst you will claim that these results (below, left) are acceptable?

No one.

This is not a question of vanity. This is about dignity.

We have a winning argument. It’s just a question of making the case to the right people at the right time, being persistent, being patient, and keeping our sights set on the goal: parity for flat closure.

Kim Bowles, for NCCS

Read the whole guest post here.

#aestheticflatclosure
#putflatonthemenu
#notputtingonashirt

Your Killer Life Podcast: Aesthetic Flat Closure

“Optimal reconstructive surgical outcomes are for everyone, and we are the ones to decide and define what reconstruction looks like for us.”- Tammey Grable-Woodford

Kim spoke with host Tammey of Your Killer Life about informed consent, her personal story of flat denial, aesthetic flat closure as a valid reconstructive option, how women can advocate for their choice, and resources we have available for women facing mastectomy, revision, or explant surgery. Available where you get your podcasts. Now also available to watch:

Informed Consent

An agreement between patient and provider after full disclosure of all medical options and their risks and benefits, to a specific medical intervention (treatment, test, or procedure). There are flour elements to informed consent:

  1. The patient must have the capacity (ability) to make a decision
  2. The provider must disclose all relevant information on the intervention
  3. The patient must comprehend the information provided
  4. The patient must give consent without coercion or duress
#aestheticflatclosure
#putflatonthemenu
#notputtingonashirt

Vlog with Stacie-Rae: Flat Closure Informed Consent and Advocacy

NPOAS President Kim Bowles spoke with Stacie-Rae, professional restorative tattoo artist, innovator, and quality advocate. They discuss aesthetic flat closure, informed consent in medicine, managing expectations, and advocacy strategy.

Flat Closure Zoom with Kim & Stacie-Rae: Informed Consent and Advocacy

Informed Consent

An agreement between patient and provider after full disclosure of all medical options and their risks and benefits, to a specific medical intervention (treatment, test, or procedure). There are flour elements to informed consent.

  1. The patient must have the capacity (ability) to make a decision
  2. The provider must disclose all relevant information on the intervention
  3. The patient must comprehend the information provided
  4. The patient must give consent without coercion or duress

Restorative Tattoo: A highly specialized practice of paramedical tattooing, which restores the appearance of the nipple and/or areola (reference). Surgical reconstruction of the nipple can produce a nipple-like contour (shape) but permanent coloration and detail restoration requires modification with ink.

Learn more about Stacie-Rae’s work

Stacie-Rae is a leading restorative tattoo artist and founder of the Areola Restorative Tattoo (A.R.T.) training and certification program (and print book). Stacie-Rae is also the creator of Nipplebacks temporary nipple tattoos. As a mastectomy patient herself who recently explanted to flat after her implants were recalled, she’s a tireless advocate for optimal quality standards for restorative tattooing.

My Body, My Choice: Aesthetic Flat Closure After Mastectomy

Our Bodies Ourselves published our guest post about aesthetic flat closure!

Thanks to Our Bodies Ourselves for helping spread the word about aesthetic flat closure! This pioneering organization has worked to promote women’s health and bodily autonomy for decades. Every woman facing mastectomy deserves full and fair disclosure of all of her reconstructive options, and for her choice to be respected.

One of the questions we ask is “Why?” Why do so many women end up looking far different than they expected?

We believe these outcomes are the direct result of decades of unclear language, unchecked paternalism and protectionism, and medical training which reinforces the myth that women cannot be “whole” without breasts.

One problem is that “flat” is an ambiguous term. To address this, flat advocates have been fighting to get official recognition of flat closure as a reconstructive choice deserving of the same respect and consideration as breast mound reconstruction.

Finally, institutions are starting to listen. Recently, as a result of our efforts at Not Putting on a Shirt, the National Cancer Institute added the term “aesthetic flat closure” to its official Dictionary of Cancer Terms, defining it as a reconstructive and aesthetic surgical procedure. And just like that, women have the clear language we’ve been needing so desperately for so long, to tell our surgeons exactly what we want.

Kim Bowles, for Our Bodies Ourselves

Read the whole guest post here.

#aestheticflatclosure
#putflatonthemenu
#notputtingonashirt

Pioneers in Flat Advocacy: Nikki “Trip” Tripplett


Pioneers in Flat Advocacy

A blog series designed to highlight and amplify the voices of the flat advocates who blazed the trail and laid the foundation for those that followed.


Nikki “Trip” Tripplett

Nikki “Trip” Tripplett was diagnosed with multifocal breast cancer at age 36, in 2015. She had a strong family history of breast cancer, and had the full battery of treatments – chemo, single mastectomy followed by contralateral mastectomy, radiation, and more surgery. Trip lives in Texas with her longtime partner, Unique, and is a runner, influencer, entrepreneur, and breast cancer advocate. In 2018 she walked the runway during NY Fashion Week 2020 for the #Fearless fashion show by #Cancerland and #AnaOno benefitting Metavivor – she also interviewed other participants. She was interviewed on Houston’s Isaiah Factor Uncensored about her experience. Trip has worked extensively with the Young Survival Coalition to fundraise, provide support programs to cancer survivors, represent her community and get information about breast cancer into the community discourse, and has been featured in both Forbes and Glamour Magazine. Find her on Instagram at @ThatDamnTrip and on Instagram and Facebook @TheCancerPreneur.


When you were making your reconstructive choice, how did you end up choosing flat?

“I was NEVER making a reconstruction choice, I just knew that I didn’t want to live with JUST ONE Breast.  It took me a year of wearing Hospital socks stuffed in my bra and constant lopsidedness for me to even realize that I needed to make a choice.  I knew prosthetics were Not the route I would be choosing because they were heavy AF, and they were never made to match the skin color of a black woman… Nothing worse than a black breast prosthetic and a cinnamon Mocha almond Naturally colored breast 😉 When I had finally had a year of living lopsided and the mental anguish that came along with it, I called my surgeon and told her we needed to talk…  It was NEVER my intentions to be flat, yet reconstruction was NEVER an option to me either… By speaking with my surgeon and explaining to her where I was mentally, she understood that all I was longing for in my recovery was ‘Symmetry’!!! And when I heard those words, it was like it was describing my needs to a T!!  I wanted symmetry back in my life and going FLAT offered the BEST option for me to have that.”

How has your surgical result affected your healing process moving forward?

“I believe I would’ve never begun to heal mentally or emotionally had I never made the choice of symmetry!  I was lost with how my body was ‘Supposed to look’ with 1 breast…  My confidence about my Physical appearance was Under my shoe!  My posture was terrible due to me trying so hard to ‘Hide’ the fact that I only had 1 breast!  And my sex life with my Long time partner was NON EXISTENT to say the least!!  

When I made the choice and listened to my Doctor to clearly know that this was the RIGHT choice is when I finally accepted what was to be and opened up to the idea!! I started to be FREE just be making the decision.  I thank God everyday that my surgeon was soooo vain about her work, therefore she created a BEAUTIFUL masterpiece out of my Chest!  Besides the scars it looks as if I have been flat for eternity and I can look at myself with total admiration and awe!  I love my new Body and appreciate my medical team for even allowing me the OPTION without the Guilt or pressure to reconstruct!  That was a big factor as well..  “

How did you decide that you wanted to be an advocate?

“I have no problems running my mouth about the Good, the Bad and the UN Fucking Fair!! Advocating became a part of my Daily routine during treatment because I was BLACK, GAY and battling breast cancer (Triple entendre) which to most people in the medical field seemed to be FUCKING RARE… I was told everyday what I couldn’t do with my body!  Healthcare professionals left me out of the same health conversations that they were having with the white patients and I was determined to get the same level of care that I was seeing them get!  It was ADVOCATE or DIE!!”

What is your proudest accomplishment as an advocate?

“Being in Forbes.com with a Gold Grill in my mouth the reads, ‘Fuck Cancer’ all BIG, BOLD and Ghetto as hell!! But that is what I was going for because to me Cancer is BIG! It doesn’t care about your status, your money or your Privilege. Cancer will try to find a way to let you know it is BIGGER than you If You Let It!  Cancer is BOLD!  It doesn’t give a fuck how it humiliates you, its gonna get what it wants at Whatever cost to you…  And, cancer loves the Underserved.  It’s the Cancer VIP section and just like anything else, it’s seen as a secret killer in most of our Ghettos.  This shit needs to stop and the only way to stop it is to get the attraction in a ‘ghetto ass way’ so to speak!”

What has been your biggest challenge as an advocate?

“Keeping the emotion out of the business.  Too many people are dying and I feel like I shouldn’t even make friends in the community anymore.  It’s hard to focus on advocating when on days you feel like shit… But I think of those that Can’t speak for themselves or those that don’t even know what to say!  I advocate from the heart and it can be mentally draining.  Plus I suck at knowing stats and such, I just know that people are dying! I know that peoples options are being denied! and I know that at a time like this in people’s lives, that shit can SUCK sometimes just as bad if not worse than the cancer itself!”

What have you learned as an advocate that you would like other advocates to know?

“It’s Okay to advocate YOUR WAY!! Being it through organizing support groups to being on the senate steps topless demanding a difference!  Hell I advocate for the Hood and that has landed me in some of the biggest names and on the biggest stages and in the Largest magazines that one could ever dream of being on!! Advocate from the Heart and watch how many lives you touch along the way.”

What is your vision for flat advocacy generally? What do you want the future to look like for women going flat?

“It may sound a bit corny, but I’m not a ‘Flat Advocate,’ I’m more so a, ‘Live you life the way you fuckin’ feel good’ kinda advocate!  And if for some that means making the hard decision to go flat, then I will support them by all means. I do want individuals Gay or straight to know that going flat is Their choice and not anyone else’s to make.  It can be a Beautiful way to continue life but they Must speak up for themselves and Do the due diligence of finding the right doctors that understand their wants and needs.  It’s a life changing decision so I want people to know that yes, people’s perceptions of them will change and Yes, there will be those that criticize your choices… But in the end, it’s about Life and living on our terms and with that we deserve the best care and the best options for our choice. Period!”


A pioneer may start as a lone voice in the wilderness, but their passion for and commitment to their cause inspires others to join them. This has led to exponential growth in the field of flat advocacy over the last decade or so. In 2020, we have flat photography projects, full length memoirs, nonprofit organizations, communities on social media, and even gatherings across the world… all made possible by the work of the advocates who blazed the trail.

If you know of a pioneer in flat advocacy that you’d like to see featured, please let us know!


Disclaimer: Any and all information published by Not Putting on a Shirt (NPOAS) on behalf of a third party is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as a substitute for medical or legal advice from a licensed professional. Views expressed and claims made by third parties do not necessarily represent the views of NPOAS.